Overview



What parasites should I worry about in my cat? 
What is a “Heartworm” test and do we recommend it for your cat? 
Parasite prevention options for your cat




What parasites should I worry about in my cat?

 

It's SPRING you say!  It's PARASITE SEASON we say! The warmer temperatures we all love at this time of year bring with them grass and flowers, birds and parasites.  It is very important to educate yourself about the risks of parasites to your pet and to your family, and choose a parasite prevention program that works for you. 

 

1. External Parasites:  Fleas, ticks, lice and mange mites. 

Every pet is at risk of coming in contact with external parasites. Even an apartment cat! Read more below!  

FLEAS are found in all environments. They jump from far distances when they sense carbon dioxide to take a blood meal from an animal. They can be carried into homes and apartment hallways on animals, or even on clothing.  Once they take a blood meal, they drop off the pet and start laying eggs. They lay up to 40 eggs each per day and in that manner, rapidly reproduce in floorboards, carpets and furniture where they can lay dormant for up to 6 months.  They cause intense itching to most cats.  Preventing a flea problem is much easier than treatment a flea problem, so consider a flea prevention on for all pets.   

image of tick sizes

TICKS are found in leaf litter, green spaces, tall grasses and the fringe areas around these spaces. There are many species of ticks found in Ontario, but the recent rise in the Deer Tick has led to health concerns in humans and animals because it transmits several diseases, including Lyme Disease and Anaplasmosis.  Cats appear to be resistant to most tick-borne diseases, but they can carry ticks from outdoors into the home.  Ticks can be extremely small, so relying on visualization of the tick for removal is not effective. 

LICE, MITES:  These external parasites are also found in the environment and can cause intense itching. Mange mites are transmissible to humans.

 

2. Internal Parasites: Heartworm, hookworm, roundworm, whipworm and tapeworm

image of cat internal parasites

Pets can contract heartworm from a mosquito bite. They can contract other intestinal parasites by drinking contaminated water, eating contaminated grass or dirt, or coming in contact with other animal’s feces.  Many intestinal parasites are transmissible to humans with children, pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals being at greatest risk  

HEARTWORM is present in low numbers in our area, but is common in communities within 1 hour of Kitchener/Waterloo.  Cats are not very susceptible to heartworm infection, although it is possible. 

TAPEWORM:  Cats can get tapeworm infection from eating a single flea.  The tapeworm grows in the cat’s small intestine and segments containing eggs are shed in the cat’s stool. They often stick to the hair around the cat’s anus and look like small grains of rice.   

WHIPWORMS, ROUNDWORMS, HOOKWORMS:  Intestinal parasites are common in the environment.  Many cats can carry and shed the eggs of these parasites without showing any signs.  Monthly deworming is an effective way to treat and prevent most intestinal parasites.  

 

What prevention product is best for my pet?

 

After reading the above information, you can answer a few simple questions that will help us find a product that is best for your cat. Check out our prevention plans to help find the correct product for your pet, or call us and we can help you. 





What is a “Heartworm” test and do we recommend it for your cat?

Heartworm disease: A parasite that is spread by mosquitoes and live in the vessels round the heart or in the heart. The parasites can silently do their damage for years before clinical signs of heart failure are noted. Unlike dogs, cats appear to be quite resistant to heartworm disease, although infections are possible.  Running a blood test can screen your cat for this disease. 

image of happy cat

So, if heartworm disease is rare in cats, why do we recommend testing?

Spring in Ontario is a time for educating pet owners about the risks of parasites and how to prevent them.  The pet and veterinary communities come together to promote preventative health.  Our reference lab offers wellness blood testing at reduced prices, combined with heartworm testing, as part of this preventative health awareness campaign every year.  This offers an excellent opportunity to run wellness blood screening on your cat to assist us in assessing his/her overall health at a discounted price.    

Why is wellness blood testing important for your cat?

In young healthy cats, wellness blood testing need not be done frequently, but preforming a wellness profile at least once in cats under 8 years of age will offer a great baseline for future health. If health concerns do arise in young cats, such as chronic vomiting, bloodwork is recommended more frequently. 

After 8 years of age, wellness blood testing becomes more important for picking up subtle disease in our senior and geriatric cats and trending those changes.  Cats often have no clinical signs in early disease and they are very good at hiding illness. Symptoms can be easy to miss, especially if changes have occurred slowly.  

Weight loss, picky appetite, vomiting, increased drinking or urinating outside of the litter box are just some of the many symptoms you can watch for as your pet ages.  Health problems that are commonly identified in cats on routine bloodwork include kidney disease, hyperthyroidism, diabetes, chronic pancreatitis and liver or gallbladder disease.   

Please call or email us to book your pet in for a Wellness test today.

Discounted prices end July 31st, 2019

519-653-1003 or [email protected]




PARASITE SEASON OPTIONS -CATS

COMPLETE OUTDOOR CAT PROTECTION

WHO?:
Cats that spend time outdoors

WHY?:

-Fleas jump large distances and are found in all outdoor environments. 1 flea entering the home can lead to a flea infestation.  

-Monthly intestinal parasite and heartworm prevention is recommended in all cats during the summer months.

-Cats do not appear to be susceptible to Lyme Disease but cats could carry ticks into the home. Contact with Bravecto would kill the tick.

-Ingestion of a single flea can lead to tapeworm infection.

WHAT?:

-Protect your cat from fleas and ticks.

-
Prevent and treat intestinal parasites from the environment.

-Protect your family from external and internal parasites that are transmissible to humans.

HOW?:

-TOPICAL BRAVECTO every 2-3 months and Oral Milbemax every month

-Year round for cats that are outdoors all year


-For 9 months from March-November for cats that do not go outdoors in winter. 
*Efficacy against ticks declined slightly in the third month so for high risk cats needing complete tick protection, repeat every 2 months. Flea protection is protective for 3 full months.  


COMPLETE INDOOR CAT PROTECTION (No tick protection)

WHO?:
Cats with limited supervised time outdoors.  Owners are not concerned about ticks

WHY?:

-Fleas jump large distances and can be carried into the home on other pets, or on clothing.  1 flea entering the home can lead to a flea infestation.  

-Monthly intestinal parasite and heartworm prevention is recommended in all cats during the summer months.

-Ingestion of a single flea can lead to tapeworm infection.

WHAT?:

-Protect your cat from fleas.

-
Prevent and treat intestinal parasites from the environment.

-Protect your family from external and internal parasites that are transmissible to humans.

HOW?:

-TOPICAL Advantage Multi Once Monthly AND Oral Milbemax every 3 months in case of tapeworm infection from ingesting a flea                                                   

-for 6-9 months while your cat has access to outdoors i.e. starting in March – June


BASIC INDOOR CAT PROTECTION

WHO?:
Cats do not go outdoors and are not in homes with pets that go outdoors.  Owners are not concerned about fleas.

WHY?:

Even indoor cats can be exposed to intestinal parasites. Ingestion of a flea can transmit tapeworm. Potted plants can contain parasites. Exposure to a mouse or other rodent can spread intestinal parasites.

WHAT?:

-Prevent and treat intestinal parasites from the environment.

-Protect your family from external and internal parasites that are transmissible to humans.

HOW?:

-Periodic deworming with Milbemax every 3-12 months.

Location & Hours

Location

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Office Hours

Our Regular Schedule

Office Hours

Monday:

8:00 am-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-7:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-7:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-7:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-7:00 pm

Saturday:

9:00 am-4:00 pm

(Vet available 9-3)

Sunday:

9:00 am-4:00 pm

(Vet available 10-2)

Emergency Hours

Monday - Thursday:

6:00 pm - 8:00 am

Friday:

6:00 pm - Monday 8:00 am

Saturday, Sunday:

Open 24 hrs

Friday 6:00 pm - Monday 8:00 am

Open 24 hrs a day on all statutory holidays

For Pet Emergencies call (519) 650-1617

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